Bodybuilder to Gymnast?

It’s a classic question: can a top level performer in one sport or domain succeed in another. Everyone thought powerlifters would make good olympic lifters because hey, if you can deadlift 900 lbs, clean and jerking 400 should be no sweat. Unfortunately it’s not the case. In this scenario, we see if a bodybuilder can be a gymnast. Take a look.

MuscleMania Universe champion Ty O-g decided to put it to the test, as part of his prep for the Universe competition in June 2013. Always looking for new challenges, the reigning British champion teamed up with top gymnastic trainer Alex Jerrom to learn a basic but challenging gymnastic move – the muscle up on rings.

Answer: Reps, Sets, and Maxes

What do the following mean? Are there differences among them? If so, what are they? Be specific. 

Answers: 

A.) 3×5 back squat – three sets of five repetitions of the back squat using the same weight across all three sets. Unwritten are the warm up reps to those three sets. Rest is as needed, but generally it is around 2-4 minutes. This is also the same as D.)

B.) 5,5,5 back squat – three sets of five repetitions of the back squat, but unlike A.) and D.), you increase the weight after each set. Unwritten are the warm up reps leading to those three sets. The first “working” set should be heavy. Rest is as needed, but generally it is around 2-4 minutes. The last set may or may not lead to a five rep max. 

C.) 5RM back squat – stands for five rep max back squat. Warm up and work up to a five rep max using any amount of rest and # jumps leading up to a 5RM for the day. Note that this does not necessarily mean a PR (personal record), but rather a 5 rep max for that particular day which may or may not lead to a PR.

D.) Back squat 5-5-5 – Same thing as A.) 

Note that your gym may use different notations, but this is how I interpret workout notations.